STATMed teaches medical students and doctors how to study

Others teach you the WHAT.

We teach you HOW to study medicine and HOW to take boards-style tests.

STATMed teaches medical students and doctors how to study

Others teach you the WHAT.

We teach you HOW to study medicine and HOW to take boards-style tests.

What Got You Here Won't Get You Where You Need to Go

Cramming Doesn't Work

Smart people can often succeed in undergrad (or even grad programs) by getting a general overview of the content, then a few days before a test cramming like crazy to lock stuff into short term memory. This doesn’t work in med school and for board prep because there is so much coming at you so fast — and you're accountable for all of it over a long period of time.

Being a Bad Test-Taker is a Thing

A lot of people think they are all alone in not being able to show what they know on test day. On the contrary, there are distinct patterns of behavior that bad test-takers exhibit — habits they’ve built that are costing them questions. Losing sight of key clues, always narrowing to two and picking the wrong one, making impulsive mistakes, and making square pegs fit into round holes are just a few examples. Just like any other habits, once you know what yours are, you can change them using the right system.

Illustration: Medical School Stress

There's No Time to "Just Study More"

Some students have found success by working longer and harder than anyone else. And that can work … until it doesn’t. When you're studying or practicing medicine, there's not enough time in the day. So you can't just put in more raw effort. You have to put in the right kind of effort and work smarter, not harder. This means using tools to get the most bang for your buck every time you sit down to study.

Studying for Recognition is a Trap

Common study strategies like rereading, highlighting, and recopying are great if the desired outcome is to become generally familiar with the material. But how helpful is recognition on boards-style questions? It’s just enough to frustrate you, and it doesn't lead to the kind of success you are striving for. If you actually want to recall and apply vast amounts of detailed information on test day, you’ll need specific strategies to make content “stick” in a sustainable manner.

Loosely Keeping Track of Things is a Recipe for Disaster

Under normal circumstances, having a rough idea of how to budget time and a general sense of what needs to get done is completely sufficient. Medical school and boards prep are NOT normal circumstances. You need to make prioritization, time management, and organization external and explicit so you know the master plan, where to start on a given day, when you’re done, and when to move on.

What Got You Here Won't Get You Where You Need to Go

Cramming Doesn't Work

Smart people can often succeed in undergrad (or even grad programs) by getting a general overview of the content, then a few days before a test cramming like crazy to lock stuff into short term memory. This doesn’t work in med school and for board prep because there is so much coming at you so fast — and you're accountable for all of it over a long period of time.

Being a Bad Test-Taker is a Thing

A lot of people think they are all alone in not being able to show what they know on test day. On the contrary, there are distinct patterns of behavior that bad test-takers exhibit — habits they’ve built that are costing them questions. Losing sight of key clues, always narrowing to two and picking the wrong one, making impulsive mistakes, and making square pegs fit into round holes are just a few examples. Just like any other habits, once you know what yours are, you can change them using the right system.

Illustration: Medical School Stress

There's No Time to "Just Study More"

Some students have found success by working longer and harder than anyone else. And that can work … until it doesn’t. When you're studying or practicing medicine, there's not enough time in the day. So you can't just put in more raw effort. You have to put in the right kind of effort and work smarter, not harder. This means using tools to get the most bang for your buck every time you sit down to study.

Studying for Recognition is a Trap

Common study strategies like rereading, highlighting and recopying are great if the desired outcome is to become generally familiar with the material. But how helpful is recognition on boards-style questions? It’s just enough to frustrate you, and it doesn't lead to the kind of success you are striving for. If you actually want to recall and apply vast amounts of detailed information on test day, you’ll need specific strategies to make content “stick” in a sustainable manner.

Loosely Keeping Track of Things is a Recipe for Disaster

Under normal circumstances, having a rough idea of how to budget time and a general sense of what needs to get done is completely sufficient. Medical school and boards prep are NOT normal circumstances. You need to make prioritization, time management and organization external and explicit so you know the master plan, where to start on a given day, when you’re done, and when to move on.

Want to Learn More?

Watch Our Intro Video Series

Which of these sounds like you?

I'm not studying effectively.
I'm putting in the work, but I'm not seeing results.

Illustration: Bad Test Taker Medical Boards Exams

I'm a bad test-taker.
Ugh! I can't believe I missed that question!

Which of these sounds like you?

I'm putting in the work, but I'm not seeing results.

Illustration: Bad Test Taker Medical Boards Exams

Ugh! I can't believe I missed that question!

Show What You Know on Test Day

The STATMed Boards Workshops

Our one-on-one Boards Workshop help students and doctors who self-identify as "bad test-takers" learn strategies to excel on test day — so you can truly show what you know.

Learn more

Illustration: How to Pass Medical Board Exams

Show What You Know on Test Day

STATMed Boards Workshops

Our one-on-one boards workshops help students and doctors who've self-identified as "bad test-takers" learn strategies to excel on test day — so you can truly show what you know.

Learn more

Illustration: How to Pass Medical Board Exams

Check out our two-part interview on this "Inside the Boards" podcast to learn more about our philosophy and methods!


Listen on: Apple | Google | Podbean

Check out our two-part interview on this Inside the Boards podcast to learn more about our philosophy and methods!

Listen on: Apple | Google | Podbean

Learn More in Less Time

The STATMed Study Skills Class

We created The STATMed Study Skills Class when we realized no one was teaching smart med students the best way to study medicine. The 10-day STATMed Class teaches a wide array of tools to put you in charge of your study life for the rest of your career.

Learn more

Learn More in Less Time

STATMed Study Skills Class

The STATMed Class teaches smart students how to succeed in medical school or related fields, addressing classroom learning and boards preparation. We teach a variety of complex skills that our students combine into a study system that fits their unique learning needs.
Learn more

UPCOMING STATMED STUDY-SKILLS CLASSES 

DEC 26 - JAN 3

STATMed Class: Live, Online

STATMed Insights:

15 Reasons Students Struggle in Med School

Med school is hard. You're responsible for retaining a huge amount of information at a breakneck speed. And there's a chance the way you've studied your whole life is not getting you as far as it used to. Because no one teaches smart students the best ways to study. In this video, we go point by point to help you understand what makes med school so hard so you can head off challenges.
STATMed Insights:

Why Smart Students and Doctors Fail Boards Exams

A lot rides on your medical boards exams. Years of studying and hard work seem to all converge into this high-stakes test. And re-certification is no picnic either. It’s a lot of pressure. And it’s only intensified if you’re a “bad test-taker.” But bad test-taking doesn’t make you a bad physician. And it doesn’t need to spell the end of your career. 
Med School Study Tips
STATMed Study Strategy:

Why Reviewing Your Notes is a Terrible Med School Study Strategy

How much of your study time is dedicated to “reviewing”, “re-reading” or “looking over” material you have already studied? How much do you value “reviewing” material multiple times before the test? If you are unhappy with the fruits of your study labor, the answer is probably “TOO MUCH.” Why?
STATMed Insights:

15 Reasons Students Struggle in Med School

Med school is hard. You're responsible for retaining a huge amount of information at a breakneck speed. And there's a chance the way you've studied your whole life is not getting you as far as it used to. Because no one teaches smart students the best ways to study. In this video, we go point by point to help you understand what makes med school so hard so you can head off challenges.
STATMed Insights:

Why Smart Students and Doctors Fail Boards Exams

A lot rides on your medical boards exams. Years of studying and hard work seem to all converge into this high-stakes test. And re-certification is no picnic either. It’s a lot of pressure. And it’s only intensified if you’re a “bad test-taker.” But bad test-taking doesn’t make you a bad physician. And it doesn’t need to spell the end of your career. 
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STATMed Study Strategy:

Why Reviewing Your Notes is a Terrible Med School Study Strategy

Review vs. Retrieval Practice

How much of your study time is dedicated to “reviewing”, “re-reading” or “looking over” material you have already studied? How much do you value “reviewing” material multiple times before the test? If you are unhappy with the fruits of your study labor, the answer is probably “TOO MUCH.” Why?

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Get to Know Us

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Meet Ryan

In 2012, Ryan realized no one was teaching smart med students and physicians the best way to study or how to fix their test-taking issues. He used his expertise as a reading and learning specialist to create STATMed Learning to teach these med students and doctors the best ways to study medicine and how to fix test-taking issues on medical board exams.

Meet David

As an educator since 1997, David has helped bright learners of all ages overcome issues with reading, attention, learning, and test-taking. He is especially gifted at identifying where the “gears” of learning connect (or disconnect). These skill sets, along with his personality, made him uniquely qualified to join STATMed Learning in 2013; he is the lead instructor of all Boards Workshops and teaches most STATMed classes.

Get to Know Us

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Meet Ryan

Back in 2012, Ryan was working as a reading and learning specialist when he noticed something. No one was helping the smartest and hardest working folks succeed — they were expected to do it all on their own. That was especially true of those studying medicine. So Ryan created STATMed Learning to teach medical students and doctors how to study and how to pass boards-style exams.
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Meet Dave

Since 1997, Dave has been working with bright learners who are experiencing difficulties with studying, test-taking, and other academic tasks. Over the years, he's helped diverse groups of students ranging from dyslexic first-graders to doctors struggling with boards exams — and everyone in between.

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